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VAKT DOLDU. YOLCU YOLUNDA

VAKT DOLDU. YOLCU YOLUNDA GEREK KAPTAN ! ---------------------------------------------------- Daha Fazlas in Bizi Takip Edin @fenerlord6 @sevdaadirfenerbahce ---------------------------------------------------- #fenerbahe #fenerbahce #fener #fenerbahem #fenerist #fenerium #fenerli #fenerbaheyklmaz #fenerkolik #fenerlove1907 #fenerbahcesocialmedia #fenerbahebasketbol #fenerbahceorg #fenerlove #fenerbaheliyiz #fenerbaheli #fenerbahecumhuriyeti #feneronline #fenerbahcem #fenerizm #fenerbaheliler #feneryolu #fenerbahesk #fenerbaheaktr #fenerliyiz #fenerbahcesk #fenerinmacivar #fener #instafener

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This is a simple three-part contrapuntal piece in 2/4 time, two voices engage in constant motivic interplay over an incessant bass line. Each section has an alternate ending to be played on the first and second repeat.

Like the passepied, a Baroque dance movement, this variation is in 38 time with a preponderance of quaver rhythms. Bach uses close but not exact imitation: the musical pattern in one part reappears a bar later in another (sometimes inverted). Each repeated section has alternate endings for the first or second time.

The sixth variation is a canon at the second: the follower starts a major second higher than the leader. The piece is based on a descending scale and is in 38 time. The harpsichordist Ralph Kirkpatrick describes this piece as having "an almost nostalgic tenderness". Each section has an alternate ending to be played on the first and second repeat.

Variation 10 is a four-voice fughetta, with a four-bar subject heavily decorated with ornaments and somewhat reminiscent of the opening aria's melody. The exposition takes up the whole first section of this variation (pictured). First the subject is stated in the bass, starting on the G below middle C. The answer (in the tenor) enters in bar 5, but it's a tonal answer, so some of the intervals are altered. The soprano voice enters in bar 9, but only keeps the first two bars of the subject intact, changing the rest. The final entry occurs in the alto in bar 13. There is no regular counter-subject in this fugue. The second section develops using the same thematic material with slight changes. It resembles a counter-exposition: the voices enter one by one, all begin by stating the subject (sometimes a bit altered, like in the first section). The section begins with the subject heard once again, in the soprano voice, accompanied by an active bass line, making the bass part the only exception since it doesn't pronounce the subject until bar 25.

This is a canon at the fifth in 24 time. Like Variation 12, it is in contrary motion with the leader appearing inverted in the second bar. This is the first of the three variations in G minor, and its melancholic mood contrasts sharply with the playfulness of the previous variation. Pianist Angela Hewitt notes that there is "a wonderful effect at the very end [of this variation]: the hands move away from each other, with the right suspended in mid-air on an open fifth. This gradual fade, leaving us in awe but ready for more, is a fitting end to the first half of the piece." Glenn Gould said of this variation, "Its the most severe and rigorous and beautiful canon the most severe and beautiful that I know, the canon in inversion at the fifth. Its a piece so moving, so anguishedand so uplifting at the same timethat it would not be in any way out of place in the St. Matthews Passion; matter of fact, Ive always thought of Variation 15 as the perfect Good Friday spell."

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