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A free floating turbocharger is the simplest type of turbocharger. This configuration has no wastegate and cant control its own boost levels. They are typically designed to attain maximum boost at full throttle. Free floating turbochargers produce more horsepower because they have less backpressure, but are not driveable in performance applications without an external wastegate.

Before clocks were first invented, it was common practice to mark the time of day with apparent solar time (also called "true" solar time) for example, the time on a sundial which was typically different for every location and dependent on longitude. When well-regulated mechanical clocks became widespread in the early 19th century, each city began to use some local mean solar time. Apparent and mean solar time can differ by up to around 15 minutes (as described by the equation of time) because of the elliptical shape of the Earth's orbit around the Sun (eccentricity) and the tilt of the Earth's axis (obliquity). Mean solar time has days of equal length, and the difference between the two sums to zero after a year. Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was established in 1675, when the Royal Observatory was built, as an aid to mariners to determine longitude at sea, providing a standard reference time while each city in England kept a different local time.

Ideal time zones, such as nautical time zones, are based on the mean solar time of a particular meridian located in the middle of that zone with boundaries located 7.5 degrees east and west of the meridian. In practice, zone boundaries are often drawn much farther to the west with often irregular boundaries, and some locations base their time on meridians located far to the east. For example, even though the Prime Meridian (0) passes through Spain and France, they use the mean solar time of 15 degrees east (Central European Time) rather than 0 degrees (Greenwich Mean Time). France previously used GMT, but was switched to CET (Central European Time) during the German occupation of the country during World War II and did not switch back after the war. Similarly, prior to World War II, the Netherlands observed "Amsterdam Time", which was twenty minutes ahead of Greenwich Mean Time. They were obliged to follow German time during the war, and kept it thereafter. In the mid 1970s the Netherlands, as with other European states, began observing daylight saving (summer) time. There is a tendency to draw time zone boundaries far to the west of their meridians. The main reason for this is that similar working day schedules around the world have led to people rising on average at 07:00 clock time and going to bed at 23:00 clock time. Another reason is that it can allow the more efficient use of sunlight. This means that the middle of the period that people are awake ("awake time noon") occurs at 15:00 (= [7 + 23]/2) clock time, whereas - if using as clock time the time of the nautical time zone to which the location concerned geographically belongs - solar noon occurs at 12:00 (+/- 30 min) clock time. To make solar noon coincide more with awake time noon (i.e. make the sun reach its highest point closer to 15:00 clock time rather than 12:00 clock time), the time of one or even two nautical time zones to the east is chosen. Many of these locations also use DST, adding yet another nautical time zone to the east. As a result, in summer, solar noon in the Spanish town of Muxa occurs at 14:37 clock time, indeed very close to awake time noon (15:00). This westernmost area of continental Spain never experiences sunset before 18:00 clock time, even in midwinter, despite its lying more than 40 degrees north of the equator. Near the summer solstice, Muxia has sunset times (after 22:00) similar to those of Stockholm, which is in the same time zone and 16 degrees further north. Stockholm has much earlier sunrises, though. A more extreme example is Nome, Alaska, which is at 16524W longitudejust west of center of the idealized Samoa Time Zone (165W). Nevertheless, Nome observes Alaska Time (135W) with DST so it is slightly more than two hours ahead of the sun in winter and over three in summer. Kotzebue, Alaska, also near the same meridian but north of the Arctic Circle, has an annual event on August 9 to celebrate two sunsets in the same 24-hour day, one shortly after midnight at the start of the day, and the other shortly before midnight at the end of the day. Also, China extends as far west as 7334E, but all parts of it use UTC+08:00 (120E), so solar "noon" can occur as late as 15:00 in western portions of China such as Xinjiang and Tibet.

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